Dr. Daniel C. Eby

Orthopedic Surgery & Sports Medicine

Anatomy of the Knee

The knee is the body’s largest joint. It’s the place where three bones meet: the tibia, the femur and the patella. The knee is a “hinge” joint. It allows the leg to bend in one direction only.

Let’s take a closer look at the main parts of the knee’s anatomy.

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Torn MCL or ACL

There are four ligaments in the knee: the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), medial collateral ligament (MCL), and lateral collateral ligament (LCL). The ACL and PCL stabilize front-to-back knee movements, while the MCL and LCL stabilize side-to-side movements.

The ACL can be sprained or torn if the knee is straightened beyond its normal limits (hyperextended), twisted, or bent side-to-side. A sprained or torn ACL is common in sports and usually results from a hard stop or aggressive twisting of the knee.

The PCL is the least common ligament to be injured.

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Torn meniscus

The medial and lateral menisci (plural of meniscus) of the knee are two crescent moon-shaped disks of tough tissue that lie between the ends of the upper leg bone and lower leg bone that form the knee joint. Meniscus tears commonly occur during sports when the knee is twisted while the foot is planted firmly on the ground.

In people over the age of 40 whose menisci are worn down, a tar might occur with normal movement, minimal activity, or minor injury.

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Located in Jasper, IN

St. Thomas Medical Center
600 West 13th St. | Suite 200
Jasper, IN 47546

CONTACT US

Toll Free: (800) 499-7044
Phone: (812) 482-7441
Fax: (812) 482-7444

HOURS OF OPERATION

Monday thru Thursday - 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Friday - 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Saturday & Sunday - Closed